divider

Archive



Real Estate Experts Weigh In on Cause of Low Housing Inventory

/ 0 Comments

Real Estate professionals and analysts have continued to look into why there continues to be a decrease in housing inventory along with rising home prices.  Redfin has determined that more Americans are deciding to stay exactly where they are instead of moving on to another home.  In fact, they have found that, “the typical American homeowner is now staying in their home for five years longer than they did just nine years ago.”

In an article published by Housing Wire, reporter Julia Falcon states that the average homeowner in the U.S. is staying in their home for about 13 years instead of only 8 years as they did in 2010.  There are U.S. cities that blow those statistics out of the water with homeowners deciding to stay in their homes for 20 years or more.  Cities such as Salt Lake City, Houston, San Antonio, and Dallas are in Texas see home owners that have stayed in their homes since the 1950s. 

According to the article, “Redfin agent Christopher Dillard states ‘Because prices have been going up, and folks are gaining more and more equity, it’s hard to justify selling when there aren’t many if any affordable options.’”

Read the entire article.

Learn More
separator


Will Technology Change the Role of Real Estate Agent?

/ 0 Comments

Technology has impacted the way people find homes, research neighborhoods, and compare prices; in essence, buyers are able to get much of the initial legwork done by sitting at their computer or scrolling on their smart phone.  Nevertheless, when it comes to actually buying a home, about 90% of buyers still use a hired real estate agent to help them with the actual offer and contract negotiations according to a report released by the National Association of Realtors.

In an article published by Forbes, its noted that “… buyers and sellers can get to the “one yard line” without much help. But deals rarely get done unless an agent is acting as middleman.”  Real estate agents, without a doubt, add value with their professional expertise and negotiating experience.  However, the sticking point for many is the large piece of the sale that the agents get for their commission.  In many cases, the seller pays a total of 6%, with the buying and selling agent getting 3% each. 

The concept of direct sales, hasn’t yet taken over the real estate market and certainly hasn’t made real estate agents obsolete; in fact, realtors may skip showing homes whose sellers aren’t willing to pay the 3% commission.  Yet, technologically based real estate companies are still searching for ways to compete with the current real estate agent.

Case in point, companies such as Opendoor, you simply “type your address into Opendoor’s website, submit a few photos, and it will make you an offer within a couple of days. No open houses, negotiation, or waiting months for the buyer to come up with the money. In fact, the average closing time from the first offer is less than 20 days,”  according to the article written by Stephen McBride. Some experts believe this type of business could change the way people buy and sell houses and the agent’s role in the transaction.

Read the entire article.

Learn More
separator


How Has the First Time Home Buyer Profile Changed Over Time?

/ 0 Comments

If asked to describe the profile of the average “first-time home buyer”, many Americans may use descriptions such as young, newly married, young children or children on the way.  There is an idea that many have about who these would-be buyers are, what stage of life they are in and it appears it is an out-of-date perception. 

Researcher at Harvard completed a study of first time home buyers over a span of 20 years, from 1997-2017 and found some significant changes in the demographics of first time home buyers over those years.  In the paper detailing the study findings, it was stated, “While discussions of first-time home buying often tie home ownership entry to life-stage changes like marriage and the birth of a first child, a growing share of first-time home buyers do not fit this profile”.

An article published by The Wire summarizes the most telling comparison of how many first-buyers were unmarried in 1997, which was 23% of all first time home buyers, compared to a 12% increase by the time 2017 rolled around.  That year, 35% of first time home buyers had never been married.  Married home buyers made up 61% of the first time home buyers in 1997, but only 52% of first-time home buyers in 2017 were married. 

What hasn’t changed much in the span of the study, the age of first time home buyers which decreased from 34 to 32 between 1997 and 2017.  The findings reveal facts that, “suggest that there may be a fundamental shift in the way that young households are approaching first-time home purchases, such as an increased willingness to purchase homes individually or with unmarried partners”. 

Read the entire article.

Learn More
separator


Why is the Number of First Time Home Buyers Declining?

/ 0 Comments

With reports of continued low mortgage rates, many might assume the housing market would be booming with home sales.  However, it would seem that some other economic factors are affecting potential home buyers’ decisions.

The number of adults planning to purchase a home has dropped 2% since last year, and the number of first time home buyers among the groups looking to purchase a home is down 5%, from 63% in 2018 to 58% this year.  According to an article published by CNBC.com, written by Anne Cusak, a lack of affordable home coupled with worries about the economy and personal economic stability are to blame.

According to Rose Quint, the National Association of Home Builders assistant vice president for survey research, “…potential buyers are held back by the lowest levels of affordability in a decade.”  Many first time home buyers are limited in their budget; as home prices increase, they aren’t necessarily able to keep up.  Since the lower end of the real estate market has seen the fastest price increase, these home buyers are being priced out. 

Even if the home prices are within reach and the mortgage rates continue to stay low, prospective buyers are less than eager to jump in when they feel their personal finances are on shaky ground.  Cusak notes, “Buying a home is an incredibly emotional experience, and potential buyers will often pull back when they have the slightest fear of losing their jobs or losing any income.”

Read the entire article.

Learn More
separator


How Do Kids Affect Home Buying Decisions?

/ 0 Comments

Home buyers take many factors into consideration during their home search.  Price, size, location are a few that top the list for many.  When home buyers have children living at home, the search can get more complicated and additional criteria can narrow the field of prospective homes.

In a recent article published in HousingWire, Alcynna Lloyd details how home buyers with children versus home buyers without children vary in their home buying process.  With a nod to the season of “back to school”, Lloyd references a report from the National Association of Realtors where NAR chief economist Lawrence Yun said. “Of course, affordability is a part of the decision, but we have seen buyers with kids willing to spend a little more in order to land a home in a better school zone or district.” 

Confirming what many assumed to be true, the report details that more than half of home buyers that have children living at home base their search criteria on the neighborhood’s school district.  In comparison, only 10% of home buyers without children take the school district into consideration when making their home purchase. 

Additionally, childless homeowners do not feel as much pressure to sell a home quickly.  Only 14% indicated that when selling a home, speed of sale was an issue.  In contrast, 23% of homeowners with children reported selling their home with a sense of urgency.  Perhaps the timing of a school year approaching, feeling that they have outgrown a home or other financial factors influenced these households.  Nevertheless, they may be more likely to accept an offer that is not ideal.

Read the entire article.

Photo Credit: Marco Verch

Learn More
separator


Is Housing Market Ready to Rebound?

/ 0 Comments

Homeowners trying to or thinking about putting their home on the market may have been a little hesitant based on the trends in the real estate market over the past year.  As real estate professionals know, and homeowners may have noticed, the real estate market took a turn last summer.  An increased number of homes hit the market, but higher prices and decreased sales, the outlook for homeowners was less than ideal.

However, homeowners may be able to breathe a sigh of relief as this slump could be coming to an end.  With mortgage rates dipping below 4 percent and a slowed housing inventory, it appears prices and home sales should begin to climb again.

According to an article published on Realtor.com, written by Clare Trapasso, “…much of the fate of the housing market relies on mortgage interest rates. If they stay low, buyers have more money to spend on homes. So prices have more room to rise.”  However, homeowners should be aware, despite a high demand for homes as younger buyers begin their families and look to settle down, current buyers, Chief Economist Danielle Hale of realtor.com®  warns “seem a little more patient. They’re more willing to wait for a good property.”

Read the entire article.

Learn More
separator


What Challenges to Buyers with Children Face?

/ 0 Comments

Buying a home can be an overwhelmingly stressful decision.  There are many factors buyers need to take into account when making a final home purchase decision.  Location, size, floor plan, down payments, and mortgage rates are a few that buyers must consider.  The buyer’s budget is another very important factor that must be considered.  It appears, however, that a specific group of buyers is more likely to go over their set budget when purchasing a home.

According to an article published by The M Report, buyers with children seem to have trouble sticking to their budget when purchasing a home.  In fact, 25.6% of buyers with children exceeded their budget when purchasing a home.  This group also had 31% that were denied a mortgage, where buyers without children only saw 11% denied mortgages.

It appears that having children in the home increases the list of demands that buyers make for their homes.  They want shorter commute times to their workplace, which can put them in more desirable and expensive locations.  The size of the home increases as the need for more space to accommodate growing families increases.  Some buyers make sacrifices on these items in order to stay within, or at least closer, to their budget. 

To make matters more stressful for this group of buyers, many decisions on home purchases can be rushed for families as they work to ensure they are settled before the school year begins. 

Read the entire article.

Photo Credit: Franco Giovanella

Learn More
separator


Why is National Delinquency Rate is Important?

/ 0 Comments

The national delinquency rates on home is a number that may not be tracked diligently by real estate professionals.  It isn’t as widely tracked as mortgage interest rates, average days to close and housing price fluctuations, but it may offer insight to the health of the American economy.

The Mortgage Bankers Association released the most recent national delinquency rate and it is lower than it’s been in 18 years.  According to an article published by the Chicago Tribune, “That’s a big deal, because when large numbers of owners do the opposite – stop paying on their home loans for months at a time — the entire economy feels the effects. Spiking delinquencies in 2007-2008 ushered in the global financial crisis and spawned tidal waves of foreclosures that devastated borrowers and their communities.”    

It sounds like it is some great news, but what has caused the number of delinquencies to drop?  Perhaps, and most likely, we can thank the underwriting rules that were tightened up back in 2010.  Specifically, mortgage lenders are requiring a high FICO score to qualify, avoiding approving mortgages to high risk borrowers more likely to default.   These changes, coupled with continued low rates, a healthy economy and a drop in unemployment are helping ensure more home owners stay on track with their payments.

Read the entire article.

Learn More
separator


Is the Recent Dip in Home Values Cause for Concern?

/ 0 Comments

The real estate market has, for the most part, been on a steady incline for the past 5-7 years, in terms of home values.  Homeowners have been comfortably seeing the value of their house increase at a fairly consistent rate, recovering from the major decreases in value they saw about 10 years ago.

However, according to data released by Black Knight, the upward trend may be coming to an end, or at least slowing down some.  According to an article published by Housing Wire, “Home values fell 0.2% in November, down $580 for the month and marking the first time the market has seen a consecutive three-month decline since early 2012. Now, the average home is down $1,361 in value since August 2018.”

Although the growth rate varies across the United States, overall home values are still higher than they were in 2017 in 99 of the 100 markets.  So, many homeowners may still be breathing easy knowing that, over a larger span of time, the value of their home is moving in the right direction.

Read the entire article.

Learn More
separator

Disappointing Sales Figures for New Homes Reported

/ 0 Comments

In many parts of the U.S., sales of new homes continued to have a downward trend in February, falling .6 percent from January.  This, according to an article published by CNBC, is the third month in a row that the sales of new homes dropped.

In the article, the details of regional new home sales were provided.  Bringing the U.S. average down were the Midwest with a 3.7 percent decrease in sales as well as the west, with a drop of almost 18 percent.  The south and northeast regions of the U.S., however, saw increases in new home sales of 19.4 percent and 9 percent respectively.

An overall slow-down in sales is being attributed to a shortage of homes, specifically lower priced homes.  As a result, the prices are being driven up, the median price of new homes is up almost 10 percent from last year.  Couple this with rising mortgage interest rates, many first time homebuyers may have a difficult time entering the real estate market.

Read the entire article.

Learn More
separator